SANDRO ZARA

Sandro Zara is a Venetian entrepreneur who has been merging tradition with fashion for over 50 years, and who has been making cloaks since 1974, when he began his company, Artigiana Sartoria Veneta. He has always worked in the clothing industry, beginning as an agent for a textile company in 1961, going on to establish collaborations with Levi Strauss, as well as the Lanificio Cini wool mill in Vittorio Veneto (TV), a brand which he would subsequently acquire.


The history of customs
fascinates me,the pursuit of beauty
within tradition, especially within
my own Venetian tradition.

SANDRO ZARA

Sandro Zara is a Venetian entrepreneur who has been
merging tradition with fashion for over 50 years,
and who has been making cloaks since 1974, when
he began his company, Artigiana Sartoria Veneta.
He has always worked in the clothing industry, beginning
as an agent for a textile company in 1961, going on to establish
collaborations with Levi Strauss, as well as the Lanificio Cini
wool mill in Vittorio Veneto (TV), a brand which
he would subsequently acquire.

“The history of customs
fascinates me,the pursuit of beauty
within tradition, especially within
my own Venetian tradition”.

His deep respect for things belonging to the past,
a passion for textiles, and a fascination with the raw
materials used, such as low-end wools, led him to rediscover
the Tabarro, a garment that he had seen his grandparents
wearing. He began by collecting traditional Venetian
clothing: capes, greatcoats and uniforms that had been
forgotten or were no longer being used. His ever-present
avid curiosity about the industry led him to the Palazzo
Mocenigo Museum and the Maritime Museum of Chioggia,
as well as the textile archives of old closed-down wool mills,
various private and public collections, and the homes and buildings
in and around the mainland and the lagoon areas, where
he uncovered original measurements and fabrics that can
protect against the wind and the cold.

In 1990, he founded Compagnia Mercantile,
which started a new chapter in his various craftsmanship
and textile initiatives: it is here that new Tabarro models
are created, which are able to reinterpret the functionality
and practicality of the cuts and fabrics of the past.

Thanks to meticulous historical and philological research,
Sandro Zara also creates original garments through
the Barena and Cini Venezia brands.

His deep respect for things belonging to the past, a passion for textiles, and a fascination with the raw materials used, such as low-end wools, led him to rediscover the Tabarro, a garment that he had seen his grandparents wearing. He began by collecting traditional Venetian clothing: capes, greatcoats and uniforms that had been forgotten or were no longer being used. His ever-present avid curiosity about the industry led him to the Palazzo Mocenigo Museum and the Maritime Museum of Chioggia, as well as the textile archives of old closed-down wool mills, various private and public collections, and the homes and buildings in and around the mainland and the lagoon areas, where he uncovered original measurements and fabrics that can protect against the wind and the cold.

In 1990, he founded Compagnia Mercantile,
which started a new chapter in his various craftsmanship
and textile initiatives: it is here that new Tabarro models
are created, which are able to reinterpret the functionality
and practicality of the cuts and fabrics of the past.

Thanks to meticulous historical and philological research,
Sandro Zara also creates original garments through
the Barena and Cini Venezia brands.

THE TABARRIFICIO VENETO

It was many years ago now that the Artigiana Sartoria Veneta
in Mirano began making a few Tabarro models that were
used during the last century, convinced that they could still be
appreciated today, so that the use of an item of clothing
that was widely worn throughout Italy – in the regions of the
Po Valley, Veneto, and Venice in particular – would not be lost.
And so, Tabarrificio Veneto was founded, the first Tabarro atelier
in Italy, a place within memory where the past and
the future exist side by side.

Here, secrets are kept about how these garments are
made, knowledge which has taken years of study and
research to accumulate. Worthy of a place in a museum,
their considerable archive of historical garments, which
come from Veneto, Lombardy and Emilia Romagna,
provides precious material from which to draw ideas
and inspiration. Here, each Tabarro is designed, cut,
and sewn one by one, by skilled craftsmen and tailors
with years of demonstrable experience. Sandro Zara brings
back the functionality and practicality of timeless cuts
and fabrics from old models, capturing details and
fragments of a past at risk of extinction.

THE TABARRIFICIO VENETO

It was many years ago now that the Artigiana Sartoria Veneta in Mirano began making a few Tabarro models that were used during the last century, convinced that they could still be appreciated today, so that the use of an item of clothing that was widely worn throughout Italy – in the regions of the Po Valley, Veneto, and Venice in particular – would not be lost. And so, Tabarrificio Veneto was founded, the first Tabarro atelier in Italy, a place within memory where the past and the future exist side by side.

Here, secrets are kept about how these garments are made, knowledge which has taken years of study and research to accumulate. Worthy of a place in a museum, their considerable archive of historical garments, which come from Veneto, Lombardy and Emilia Romagna, provides precious material from which to draw ideas and inspiration. Here, each Tabarro is designed, cut, and sewn one by one, by skilled craftsmen and tailors with years of demonstrable experience. Sandro Zara brings back the functionality and practicality of timeless cuts and fabrics from old models, capturing details and fragments of a past at risk of extinction.


A story of passion for tradition,
combined with skilled
sartorial expertise.

A reinterpretation of tradition which is rooted in his love for high-quality, natural textiles from Italy, sees the most rustic of his yarns produced in the hinterlands of the Veneto, in collaboration with a farming co-operative, whereas he turns to one of the largest and most prestigious wool mills in Italy for his finer yarns, which is famous worldwide. Remaining faithful to traditional production techniques and safeguarding the authenticity of his Tabarro cloaks, the Tabarrificio Veneto number each of their cloaks consecutively and label them with their names. Brigantino, Nobilomo, Lustrissimo, Ruzzante, Ca’ D’oro and Hepburn are just a few examples of the models available for men and women whose names come from the ways in which and the places their original models were found.

In the nineties, the Tabarro became part of a collection and was embellished by the accessories that finish it off: the Mazziniana and Anarchist bows, the “Mascherone” fastening, the Liston hat, or the cologne. Today, Tabarrificio Veneto produces approximately 1,200 cloaks per year. That’s 6 every day, which are sold all over the world.


A story of passion for tradition,
combined with skilled
sartorial expertise.

A reinterpretation of tradition which is rooted in his love for high-quality, natural textiles from Italy, sees the most rustic of his yarns produced in the hinterlands of the Veneto, in collaboration with a farming co-operative, whereas he turns to one of the largest and most prestigious wool mills in Italy for his finer yarns, which is famous worldwide. Remaining faithful to traditional production techniques and safeguarding the authenticity of his Tabarro cloaks, the Tabarrificio Veneto number each of their cloaks consecutively and label them with their names. Brigantino, Nobilomo, Lustrissimo, Ruzzante, Ca’ D’oro and Hepburn are just a few examples of the models available for men and women whose names come from the ways in which and the places their original models were found.

In the nineties, the Tabarro became part of a collection and was embellished by the accessories that finish it off: the Mazziniana and Anarchist bows, the “Mascherone” fastening, the Liston hat, or the cologne. Today, Tabarrificio Veneto produces approximately 1,200 cloaks per year. That’s 6 every day, which are sold all over the world.

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CONTACTS

Via A. Meucci, 16 – 30035 Mirano

T. +39 041 5728454

E. online@tabarro.it